Here’s what you should be eating to have stronger teeth
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Here’s what you should be eating to have stronger teeth

Good oral health is essential to our everyday lives. Apart from brushing twice a day and flossing, what we eat plays a big role in keeping our teeth healthy. Australian dentist Dr Steven Lin, according to The Independent, has revealed which foods we should be consuming to do so. You may be surprised by the suggestions, with butter, salami and soft cheeses making the list. Writing on his website, Dr Lin explains that many people who brush and floss regularly still end up with regular dental cavities, whereas those who seem to take worse care never seem to have dental problems. “Teeth are living organs and require proper nutrition to regenerate and maintain healthy levels of enamel and dentin,” Dr Lin explains. “And without proper nutrition, your teeth will struggle to stay intact.” If you’re consuming enough vitamins and minerals, your teeth will naturally regenerate, staying strong and healthy. But if you’re not feeding your body with the right nutrients, the bacteria and acid in your mouth hinder this natural process, causing your teeth to break down faster than they can regenerate. “It’s not just sugar alone that causes cavities, it’s the lack of nutrients that strengthen teeth,” Dr Lin says. “Malnutrition has become prevalent with the modern Western diet.” So what should you be eating? Essentially it all comes down to four fat-soluble vitamins: A, D, K2, and E. Here are good sources of each: Vitamin A: Beef liver, fish, milk, and eggs. Vitamin D: Fatty fish, mushrooms and grass-fed dairy products (but sunshine is the best source). Vitamin K2: Soft cheeses, eggs, butter, liver and salami. Vitamin E: Spinach, broccoli and nuts. With a balanced, nutritious diet, you’ll keep your teeth in check, your body in shape and your skin glowing.
0 0 2 23 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health more
Eat healthy in adulthood; It can improve physical fitness in old age
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Eat healthy in adulthood; It can improve physical fitness in old age

A study looked at the long-term effect of a healthy diet during adulthood on physical function in older age and found it boosted physical fitness. The team, led by scientists at the University of Southampton, gathered data from 969 British men and women whose lifestyles have been monitored since they were born, in March 1946. The team collected information from the participants at ages 36, 43, 53, and 60-64, examining the participants’ diets at different ages in relation to three standard measures of physical function at age 60-64 – chair rise, timed up-and-go speeds, standing balance. The chair rise test measures the time taken to perform ten chair rises, rising from a sitting to a standing position and back down again; the timed up-and-go test looks at the time taken to rise from a chair, walk three metres at normal pace, turn around, return to the chair and sit down; and a standing balance test measures the time a person can stand on one leg with their eyes closed up to a maximum of 30 seconds. The results showed that those who ate more fruit, vegetables and wholegrain cereals, and fewer highly processed foods, during their adult years performed better in the three tests of physical function. In addition, the team also found that those who had improved their diet by age 60-64, when compared to their diets at a younger age, had a faster chair rise speed and a longer standing balance time, suggesting that making diet improvements even in early older age could still be particularly important for physical performance. Lead author Sian Robinson, Professor of Nutritional Epidemiology at the University of Southampton, commented on the results saying, “Improving the quality of your diet can have a beneficial effect on health whatever your age. However, this study suggests that making good dietary choices throughout adulthood - by cutting down on highly processed foods and incorporating more fruit, vegetables and whole grains into your diet - can have a significant beneficial effect on strength and physical performance later in life, helping to ensure a much healthier old age.” Professor Cyrus Cooper, Director of the MRC LEU, added that, “The link between dietary patterns and frailty in older people will open the door to effective interventions against the age-related decline in musculoskeletal function which is such a growing cause of disability in ageing populations worldwide.”
0 0 8 20 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health more
Complaint filed against Kamal Hassan
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Complaint filed against Kamal Hassan

A complaint has been filed with the Chennai police against actor Kamal Hassan for his alleged "false" comment about Nilavembu Kudineer, a herbal mixture to cure dengue. Nilavembu Kudineer, also called Nilavembu Kashayam, is Siddha Medicine recommended for prevention and management of all types of viral infections/fevers. It acts as immunostimulant and immunomodulator, which boosts immunity and modulates defense response in the body, which helps to protect from infections and their complications. It also plays a protective role in dengue fever and chikungunya. Hassan recently took to his Twitter handle, informing fans not to distribute the Siddha medicine until a proper research is conducted."It`s not that the research should be done by allopathic.The traditionalists should also have done it. It is traditional for medicines to have side effects," he posted. Disagreeing to Hassan comment, Tamil Nadu Health Minister C Vijayabaskar backed the use of the neem drink to fight against dengue.
0 0 8 20 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health more
Fracture your bones often? This could be the reason
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Fracture your bones often? This could be the reason

People in India, like some other countries in Asia-Pacific region including China, Indonesia and Vietnam, have very low calcium intake -- less than 400 mg a day, raising the risk of fractures and osteoporosis, according to a new review of the global calcium map. The findings showed that countries in the next lowest intake categories -- 400 to 500 and 500 to 600 mg/day -- are clustered in South America (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil) and scattered throughout the Far East, North Africa and elsewhere. "Outside of North America and most of Europe, particularly northern Europe, there is lower intake than there should be for good bone health," said lead author of the review report Ethan Balk, Associate Professor at the Brown University in the US. "In many parts of the world, a low average calcium intake may be putting most people at increased risk of fractures and osteoporosis," Balk added. For the new study, appearing in the journal Osteoporosis International, the team gathered data sources for many studies that reported national averages of daily calcium intake among adults pertaining to 74 countries.
Southern and eastern Asia had world's lowest average intakes -- often less than 400 mg a day, while only North European countries registered intakes of greater than 1,000 mg a day. Countries in South America and Africa mostly had average intakes in the middle, between about 400 and 700 mg a day, the report revealed.
The findings would motivate action to promote increased calcium consumption, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region and in places where it hadn't been documented, the researchers said. "This work draws attention to regions where calcium intake needs to be assessed and where measures to increase calcium intake are likely to have skeletal benefits," Balk noted.
0 0 8 20 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health more
Fasting after every two days may help fight obesity
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Fasting after every two days may help fight obesity

Are unhealthy eating habits and sedentary lifestyle taking a toll on your body weight? Then here's a solution---one day of fasting after every two days may help to fight obesity and other metabolic disorders, suggests a recent study. According to researchers, an intermittent fasting, up to 16 weeks, without otherwise having to count calories may help fight obesity and other metabolic disorders. According to researchers, such fasting already shows benefits after only six weeks. The findings, conducted by Kyoung-Han Kim and Yun Hye Kim, indicated that intermittent fasting in mice helped to kick-start the animals' metabolism and to burn fat by generating body heat. The research team was led by Hoon-Ki Sung of The Hospital for Sick Children in Ontario, Canada. The research has shown that our unhealthy eating habits and sedentary lifestyles are playing a major role in the development of lifestyle-related metabolic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity. They exposed the groups of mice to 16 weeks of intermittent fasting. The recurring regimen saw the animals being fed for two days, followed by one day without anything to eat. Their calorie intake was not adjusted otherwise. Four months later, the mice in the fasting group weighed less than those in the control group who continued to eat the same volume of food. The lower body weight of the mice in the fasting group was not the only effect. The fasting regime helped lower fat build-up in the white fat by increasing the brown-like fat, which involved in burning energy and producing body heat of mice on the high fat diet. Their glucose and insulin systems also remained more stable. They found that such intermittent fasting tempers an immune reaction in fat cells. "Intermittent fasting without a reduction in calorie intake can be a preventative and therapeutic approach against obesity and metabolic disorders," says Kyoung-Han Kim.
0 0 6 19 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health more
Obesity would rise chances of throat cancer in men
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Obesity would rise chances of throat cancer in men

Obesity is fuelling a big rise in men suffering one of the deadliest cancers, warn experts. More than 5,600 men develop cancer of the gullet each year, which is often diagnosed late and has shocking rates of survival. Even with the best care, patients only live three to nine months on average and just 13 per cent survive five years or more. Men are three times more likely to develop the disease than women, who are protected by their hormones until after the menopause. The number of people diagnosed each year with oesophageal cancer in the UK has doubled to around 8,400, including 2,800 women. Cancer affecting the oesophagus, or gullet, that links the throat and stomach, have been rising for 30 years. It is thought obesity which can cause acid reflux or heartburn - where the contents of the stomach flow back up the gullet - is one of the main factors behind the rise of a form of the disease. But experts fear many people are ignoring warning signs of persistent heartburn and so are their GPs. Tim Underwood, an oesophageal surgeon and researcher at the University of Southampton, said people taking over-the-counter remedies such as Gaviscon for more than three weeks should be aware the problem may not just be indigestion. 'What I say to GPs when I go out to visit them is that if a middle-aged man who has never seen you before turns up with reflux it needs to be investigated. 'They've come to you for the first time with something that we know is linked to potentially serious disease' he added. Mr Underwood said between 10 per cent and 14 per cent of the population have reflux at any time and it is getting more common. He said 'From a surgical point of view, we're seeing a link between obesity and reflux and there is definitely a link between obesity and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. So you could join the three dots together. 'We know that obesity can change the dynamics at the border between the oesophagus and the stomach that potentially leads to more reflux.' Patients are often diagnosed late because early symptoms are ignored or not taken seriously. In some cases changes could be occurring to the cells lining the gullet that may mark a first step to the disease, while another symptom to watch out for is difficulty swallowing food. Mr Underwood said 'Food getting stuck when you swallow and persistent heartburn are not normal. 'If this is happening to you, you need to see your GP. The vast majority of people won't have anything seriously wrong with them, but it's important to be checked out. 'If left untreated acid reflux can damage cells of the oesophagus leading to a condition called Barrett's oesophagus, which in turn can be a precursor of oesophageal cancer.' Professor Rebecca Fitzgerald, from the Medical Research Council's Cancer Cell Unit in Cambridge, said 'One of the real problems is that heartburn and reflux symptoms are seen as a nuisance, but something that's quite normal.' Cancer survivor father-of-two Ian Barclay, 65, from Salisbury, told how he used Zantac to suppress symptoms of acid reflux. “That seemed to do the trick - I never went to the doctor because I wasn't that way inclined,” he said. But he was eventually diagnosed with oesophageal cancer after suffering serious internal bleeding caused by the tumour. 'I was very lucky because the cancer was caught early enough to get it all out during surgery, so I didn't need chemotherapy or radiotherapy,” Mr Barclay added. 'The most important thing is if you get any problems, anything you're not sure of, go to your local doctor. If you don't like what he says, go somewhere else.”Other factors linked to this cancer include smoking, eating too little fruit and vegetables, and drinking alcohol. However, better eradication of a stomach bug called Helicobactor pylori may have inadvertently reduced its protective effect against this cancer.Chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery remain the only treatment options for the disease.Prof Fitzgerald is involved in a major study aiming to pinpoint genes that may provide targets for new more tailored treatments. Her team is also trialling a new diagnostic technique which uses a 'sponge on a string' passed down a patient's throat to look for early pre-cursors of oesophageal cancer which might replace a more uncomfortable and lengthier procedure called endoscopy.Mr Underwood is taking part in the New York marathon with five colleagues to raise money for oesophageal cancer research through Cancer Research UK.  
0 0 9 17 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health more
Consuming placenta borders on cannibalism
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Consuming placenta borders on cannibalism

Many believe the placenta has nourishing benefits. However, one gynaecologist said there is no evidence to suggest it boosts health and the “practice borders on cannibalism". Celebrities like Kim Kardashian and Coleen Rooney who have admitted to eating it has created a trend with many new mothers. It has become so popular that a vegan mother caused quite a stir online when she posted an image of her placenta on Facebook, which she later consumed. In recent times, human placenta is consumed in many forms: raw, cooked, roasted, dehydrated, steamed and dehydrated in capsule form, or in smoothies or other drinks. The placenta, also known as afterbirth, grows throughout the pregnancy delivering nutrients and oxygen to the baby. It is also where waste passes. "Medically speaking, the placenta is a waste product," gynaecologist Alex Farr, from the Medical University of Vienne said. "After the placenta is genetically part of the newborn, eating the placenta borders on cannibalism," she added. It does not contain high amounts of nutrients like iron, selenium and zinc that many presume it does. In fact, "heavy metals have been found to accumulate in the placenta during pregnancy", the report stated. The US Department of Health had reported of a mother who had eaten placenta capsules and suffered a life-threatening blood poisoning. New research is also advising obstetricians to discourage their patients from eating the placenta in any form. While eating placenta had beneficial effects on animals, further research is needed to understand why.
0 0 12 17 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health more
As You Age Obesity Could Increase the Risk Of Irregular Heartbeat
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As You Age Obesity Could Increase the Risk Of Irregular Heartbeat

Obesity is a disorder involving excessive body fat accumulation. Obesity is linked to increasing the risk of several health problems. According to a latest study, overweight men are more likely to develop irregular heartbeat at 50 years of age, which is nearly a decade earlier than women. Men were diagnosed with atrial fibrillation - a condition in which the upper chambers of the heart, or atria, quiver instead of beat to move blood effectively - at 50 years of age, while women developed the condition at 60 or at older age.Scientists revealed that the increase in rate could be attributed to a higher body mass index (BMI) in men (31 per cent) compared to women (18 per cent). The team examined records of 79,793 people (aged 24 to 97) who were followed for a period of 12.6 to a maximum of 28.2 years. "We advise weight reduction for both men and women," said Christina Magnussen, medical specialist at the University Heart Center in Hamburg, Germany. "As elevated body mass index seems to be more detrimental for men, weight control seems to be essential, particularly in overweight and obese men," Magnussen added. The study published in the journal Circulation also suggested that higher blood levels of C-reactive protein (inflammation marker) could also play a role in increasing the risk specifically in men.All these factors combined, were found to increase the risk of stroke by five times as well as more than tripled a person's risk of dying due to heart ailments. "It's crucial to better understand modifiable risk factors of atrial fibrillation," Magnussen said. "If prevention strategies succeed in targeting these risk factors, we expect a noticeable decline in new-onset atrial fibrillation," he added. Obesity has become one of the most prevalent health concerns in the recent times. Common causes of obesity include, genetics, overeating and certain psychological factors. The good news however is, that in most cases you can regulate your weight and treat the condition. Here are some pointers by consultant nutritionist Dr. Rupali Dutta which may help you get started. 1.Load up on whole grains over processed grains . Whole grain provide energy to sustain and grow and are also a major source of all essential nutrients. Whole grains like Bajra, Ragi, Maize and Jowar, are some of the nutritional picks. Try red and black and brown rice instead of white rice . 2. Buy whole dals in addition to the staple washed dals. Fill up your shelves with Rajma, Chana, Soy, Add these as sprouts or cook them for your meal at least once every two days. When buying meat, choose the lean, low fat cuts. Add a protein in every major meal. Proteins are essential for the body. 3. Ensure 3 servings of seasonal vegetables per head and 2 of whole fruits per day. They provide both soluble and insoluble fibre in addition to vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. We need about 25-30gms of fibre per day, one apple provides only 1gm. 4. Try keeping the trans fats at bay.Fast foods, snack food, fried foods cookies, margarine and spreads) could be loaded with industrial trans fats, which are excessively fattening.
0 0 9 17 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health, life more
Japanese man invents coffee made from garlic
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Japanese man invents coffee made from garlic

Yokitomo Shimotai, a Japanese man, has invented a caffeine-free version of coffee made from garlic. Loaded with health benefits, this drink can be used as an alternative for coffee-bean coffee which contains caffeine, an unhealthy component. An invention made thirty years ago It was a cooking blunder that happened 30 years ago which triggered the idea of making coffee with garlic in the mind of Yokitomo Shimotai. Kyodo News reported that during his young age, Shimotai burned steak and garlic while waiting at a coffee table in Aomori Prefecture. Due to curiosity, Shimotai mixed the scorched garlic in hot water, and surprisingly, it tasted like coffee. Shimotai kept aside his idea of making coffee with garlic till his retirement. After saying 'Adios' to his professional career, the Japanese man spent lots of time in conducting researches for making coffee with garlic. After repeated trial and errors, Shimotai finally made a recipe which gave the full essence of coffee. In the process, Shimotai used an electronic furnace to roast the garlic, and finally mashed it up for mixing it with hot water to make a perfect cup of coffee. In 2015, he took the patent of this method. Shimotai also opened a garlic coffee-making workshop in Iwate Prefecture. Garlic coffee: An unusually tasty experience In a recent talk with Kyodo News, the 74-year old man confidently said that this is probably the first drink of its kind in the world. Shimotai added that this coffee is very much preferred for people who wish to drink it at night, as it does not contain caffeine. This drink is also recommended for pregnant women, as a high amount of caffeine is not that great for carrying ladies. Even though the drink contains garlic, it will not produce bad breath, as the garlic is thoroughly roasted before using. The garlic coffee has fetched positive reviews from users, and it is now available in two souvenir shops in Aomori Prefecture. Shimotai has priced a packet needed to make one cup of garlic coffee at 3.90 Singapore dollars.
0 0 9 17 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health, life more
Attention Men ! Your Diet Can Determine the Newborn’s Health Too
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Attention Men ! Your Diet Can Determine the Newborn’s Health Too

Planning to be a father soon? Make sure that your diet is in place before you take the plunge. According to a latest study, a man's diet before conceiving a baby could play a much bigger role than previously imagined. The diet can impact the newborn's health suggests the new study. The study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, revealed that men must include fish, meat, vegetables and fruits in their daily diet adding that a low carbohydrate and high protein diet by the father will help the child's healthier once they are born For the study, the researchers from the University of Cincinnati in Ohio examined male fruit flies and the impact of their diet on their next progeny. Fruit flies share 60 percent of genes with humans. After altering diet, the team mated male fruit flies with females. The results indicated that offspring were less likely to survive if their fathers consumed a poor diet of high carbohydrates and low protein. The researchers revealed that men who are planning to be fathers should have a diet consisting of fish, meat, vegetables and fruit while cutting out pasta, rice and white bread. Sugary foods like sweets, cakes and biscuits are also to be avoided. Researchers said that many human species encourage mothers to exercise extra care. But it was a real surprise to find a link between paternal diet and offspring. The researchers claimed that there are several other influences men have on babies' health that are not necessarily coded within genes, a concept called epigenetics.These influences include direct environmental effects such as exposure to toxins that can be passed from the father to his offspring through his semen. For the experiment, female fruit flies were fed the same diet while males had different ones consisting of yeast and sugars. After following the strict diet for 17 days, the males were mated with two females. It was found that the embryos were more likely to survive if they had a father with a high protein and low carbohydrate diet.
0 0 11 16 October, 2017 Alternative, Food, Health more